DIALS IN POETRY & LITERATURE

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A NEW DROP-DOWN ADDED TO ‘SUNDIALS IN ART’ FOR OCCASIONAL INCLUSION OF DIALS REFERENCED IN POETRY & LITERATURE

Rosalind: “I pray you, what is’t o’clock?”

Orlando: “You should ask me, what time o’ day; there’s no clock in the forest.”

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A BIBLICAL SUNDIAL . ISAIAH 38.8

Behold, I will bring again the shadow of the degrees, which is gone down in the sun dial of Ahaz, ten degrees backward. So the sun returned ten degrees, by which degrees it was gone down. (KJV)

Context: Hezekiah, mortally ill, prays as a good man for recovery, and ‘wept sore’. The Lord messaged him via Isaiah that the prayer and tears had been noted and that his lifespan would be extended by 15 years. To prove His sincerity He performed the sundial trick. Hezekiah recovered and was duly grateful. [This is not to be confused with the turning back of time that Cher so ardently wished for]

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SHAKESPEARIAN (SUN)DIALS

An excellent collection of a dozen specific references to dials in Shakespeare’s plays and sonnets can be found on the North American Sundial Society website HERE

One good example given is from Romeo and Juliet Act II Scene IV during exchanges involving Romeo, Mercutio and the Nurse, during which Mercutio says “…for the bawdy hand of the dial is now upon the prick of noon”.